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3 Steps to effective listening (4)

3 Steps to effective listening (4)

Step 1: Try to feel what the speaker is feeling.
If you feel sad when the person with whom you are talking expresses sadness, joyful when she expresses joy, fearful when she describes her fears—and convey those feelings through your facial expressions and words—then your effectiveness as a listener is assured. Empathy is the heart and soul of good listening.
To experience empathy, you have to put yourself in the other person's place and allow yourself to feel what it is like to be her at that moment. This is not an easy thing to do. It takes energy and concentration. But it is a generous and helpful thing to do, and it facilitates communication like nothing else does.

Step 2: Give the speaker regular feedback.
Show that you understand where the speaker is coming from by reflecting the speaker's feelings. "You must be thrilled!" "What a terrible ordeal for you." If the speaker's feelings are hidden or unclear, then occasionally paraphrase the content of the message. The idea is to give the speaker some proof that you are listening, and that you are following her train of thought—not off indulging in your own fantasies while she talks to the ether.

Step 3: Pay attention to what isn't said—to nonverbal cues.
If you exclude email, the majority of direct communication is probably nonverbal. We glean a great deal of information about each other without saying a word. Even over the telephone, you can learn almost as much about a person from the tone and cadence of her voice than from anything she says. These are clues you can't ignore. When listening, remember that words convey only a fraction of the message.
Source: Dianne Schilling (MSc in Counselling and a founding partner of WomensMedia).

TARIAH DOUGLAS M(Guru) Did you learn anything? Yes No        

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If the speaker's feelings are hidden or unclear, then ______________